Accommodating respectful religious expression in the workplace

14-Jun-2017 21:12

Snyder, Jackson Lewis LLP During a presidential election season, political discussion and debate are prominent, often at family functions, social gatherings and even at work.

According to Career Builder’s last survey on politics at work, 36 percent of workers discuss politics at work, while 46 percent stated that they plan to discuss this year’s presidential election with their co-workers.

The two most common workplace complaints regarding lack of accommodations for religious people, especially religious minorities, are the lack of food options at workplace events, and the prohibition on wearing religious garments.

While our clients certainly can relate to each other in that they have all faced discrimination, each situation will be different based on the nature and severity of the conduct in question.

Religious Discrimination in the Workplace Often Goes Unpunished Despite the fact that many employers are respectful of religion and compliant with state and federal laws, some employers continue to violate employees’ rights for failing to comply with Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 among other laws.

As such, the Constitution allows private companies to regulate speech, even to bar political discussion entirely.

Public employees are more protected by free-speech rules, but even governmental entities can impose speech limits to ensure efficient operations.

The two most common workplace complaints regarding lack of accommodations for religious people, especially religious minorities, are the lack of food options at workplace events, and the prohibition on wearing religious garments.While our clients certainly can relate to each other in that they have all faced discrimination, each situation will be different based on the nature and severity of the conduct in question.Religious Discrimination in the Workplace Often Goes Unpunished Despite the fact that many employers are respectful of religion and compliant with state and federal laws, some employers continue to violate employees’ rights for failing to comply with Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 among other laws.As such, the Constitution allows private companies to regulate speech, even to bar political discussion entirely.Public employees are more protected by free-speech rules, but even governmental entities can impose speech limits to ensure efficient operations.Ahmed El-Afandi asked the group who among us knew a Muslim, worked with a Muslim, shared a meal with a Muslim, or spent time with a Muslim person in our homes. Religious diversity is part of life in the greater La Crosse Area, and embracing this diversity enriches our social and working lives.